INVENTURES

September 2017

 

What Makes a Strong Technology Alliance?

Inventures is often asked: What makes a strong technology alliance? The answer is surprisingly simple and yet difficult to execute. A strong technology alliance is centered on its industry relevance and value proposition that is usually closely tied to its IPR Policy. Additionally, an influential board, solid industry intelligence and a well-run organization are core elements to building a strong technology alliance.

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The Value of Collaboration Outside an Alliance

Even though many Inventures clients produce quality standards and solutions for broad industry adoption, Inventures also encourages its clients to collaborate productively with other organizations to reduce duplication of effort and to maximize member value.

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Client News: Android 8.0 Oreo Features Mopria Technology

Google recently announced Android 8.0 Oreo™ with a Default Print Service featuring core technology from the Mopria Print Service delivering intuitive mobile printing. This technology contribution was a result of an ongoing collaboration with the Google Android team via the Android Open Source Project and the Mopria Alliance.

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Navigating Difficult Conversations

By definition, boards of directors bring together diverse opinions and beliefs. As a result, building consensus and moving an organization forward can require conversations that may be outside of an individual's comfort zone. Columnist Elizabeth Bernstein provides several tips on how to make these difficult talks easier.

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imageWhat Makes a Strong Technology Alliance?

Inventures is often asked: What makes a strong technology alliance? The answer is surprisingly simple and yet difficult to execute. A strong technology alliance is centered on its industry relevance and value proposition that is usually closely tied to its IPR Policy. Additionally, an influential board, solid industry intelligence and a well-run organization are core elements to building a strong technology alliance.

Clear Value Proposition and IPR Policy
Member value and IPR Policy often go hand in hand and can be critical in answering the question of "Why should my company become a member?" IP licensing can be one of the greatest benefits accorded to members that may result in saving member companies substantial expense. For those providing IP for licensing, having their IP included in the standard can mean stability and potential licensing fees. In the end, a well-placed standard in the industry can provide tremendous value for members.

An Influential Board
Having influence in an industry and influencing an industry are the push and pull of a strong technology alliance. Large companies that join an alliance provide the anchor and instant legitimacy; however, being able to join an alliance in which a company can influence an industry can be priceless. Designing standards that move an industry forward will generally expand the market and each member's success in that market.

Solid Industry Intelligence
Bringing industry leadership together will result in actionable information based on insight and analysis that far surpasses what individual members can ever hope to obtain. This combined insight also allows members to develop niches that they can build and defend within the larger industry.

Strong Organization
Developing a strong organization or infrastructure enables a technology alliance to keeps its focus on the goal of the organization - developing an industry standard, certification programs, educational events AND marketing and market expansion. One of the key components of a technology alliance is awareness and expanding its sphere of influence or expanding its market. No longer can alliances take the approach of "build it and they will come…" and the organization must continually promote its value and its members.

These are the key ingredients to building a strong technology alliance and it may sound like it's easier said than done, but Inventures has a proven track record in helping clients build alliances and offers a robust suite of services to support alliances through every stage.

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imageThe Value of Collaboration Outside an Alliance

Even though many Inventures clients produce quality standards and solutions for broad industry adoption, Inventures also encourages its clients to collaborate productively with other organizations to reduce duplication of effort and to maximize member value.

A good case study of this is found with the GENIVI Alliance, an 8-year client of Inventures, and their productive relationship with the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the standards body behind the web.

When GENIVI members like Jaguar Land Rover and LG Electronics began exploring how to simplify access to car data from web applications, GENIVI and W3C began talking about co-producing standards that web application developers can use consistently and efficiently retrieve vehicle information. After a year of collaboration, W3C has draft standards in place based on GENIVI proposals that are being considered for approval.

Recognizing the mutual benefit of the GENIVI-W3C relationship, W3C recently invited Steve Crumb, GENIVI Executive Director and Vice President of Inventures, to moderate a panel entitled, "Connected Cars, Cities and the Web," during the first W3C Web Executive Forum, Wednesday, 8 November 2017 at the Hyatt Regency in Burlingame, California.

During this session, panelists will discuss the transformation already underway as cars and city infrastructures are being connected. Panelists to address this executive-level audience include Patti Robb, Head of Silicon Valley Automated Driving Innovation at Intel; Greg Bohl, VP HARMAN Connected Services; and Tina Quigley, General Manager of Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada.

The panel is related to a pilot project between GENIVI and several entities in Nevada including the City of Las Vegas and the RTC that addresses improved pedestrian safety and traffic flow in southern Nevada. Here again, collaboration with outside organizations (in this case, cities) can lead to improved alliance deliverables while helping others solve real-world problems. For more information on this pilot project, please visit http://genivi.vegas.

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imageClient News: Android 8.0 Oreo Features Mopria Technology

Google recently announced Android 8.0 Oreo™ with a Default Print Service featuring core technology from the Mopria Print Service delivering intuitive mobile printing. This technology contribution was a result of an ongoing collaboration with the Google Android team via the Android Open Source Project and the Mopria Alliance. With Mopria technology at the core of the Android 8.0 Oreo Default Print Service, users no longer need to download a mobile printing service and printer discovery is automatic, allowing easy mobile printing to more than 100 million Mopria certified printers from any Android 8.0 Oreo device. Additional details can be found here.

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imageNavigating Difficult Conversations

By definition, boards of directors bring together diverse opinions and beliefs. As a result, building consensus and moving an organization forward can require conversations that may be outside of an individual's comfort zone. Columnist Elizabeth Bernstein provides several tips on how to make these difficult talks easier. The first rule of thumb is "don't rush into it." Conversations undertaken at the very beginning of a crisis or in the heat of the moment often don't go well. Explain to the other person you want to have an important conversation and ask when it would be a good time to chat. Second, start with a question. Try to learn where the other parties involved stand on the matter rather than making assumptions. "You may not like what you hear, but at least you can find some common ground on the actual issue in dispute," reasons Dr. Woody Woodward, an organizational psychologist in Jersey City, N.J.

A third tip is to "listen compassionately." To this end, focus on listening more than talking to fully understand what is being said by all parties. During this phase of the difficult discussion, allow all sides to express emotion and be sure not to say things like, "You shouldn't feel that way" or "You are overreacting." Fourth, lower the emotional intensity of the discussion by complimenting the person, perhaps recognizing other strengths. Next, be clear about what your goals are in having this difficult talk. Ask yourself: "What do you want to get out of the discussion?" Write this down beforehand and consider taking notes during the talk if it will help you and the meeting stay on track. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, view the talk as a positive opportunity to make the situation better.
Wall Street Journal (07/17/17) Bernstein, Elizabeth

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